Nathan Clisby's homepage

me
Welcome to my homepage! I'm a mathematical physicist in the Department of Mathematics at Swinburne University of Technology, supported by an ARC Future Fellowship. I'm also an associate investigator of ACEMS.

Here you will find some details about my research (including lists of possible research topics for students and collaborators, and my publications), and various project pages where you can find interactive applications, visualisations, and in future software for download.

Recent updates (March 2017)

  • Simulations of SAWs in 4d have enabled the calculation of the logarithmic corrections to great accuracy: Monte Carlo study of four-dimensional self-avoiding walks of up to one billion steps, arXiv:1703.10557 (2017).
  • By using the length-doubling algorithm and a novel series analysis method (due to Tony Guttmann), we have obtained accurate estimates of various quantities associated with SAWs on the BCC and FCC lattices: Exact enumeration of self-avoiding walks on BCC and FCC lattices, arXiv:1703.09340 (2017). (Work with Raoul D. Schram, Gerard T. Barkema, and Rob H. Bisseling.)
  • By using a novel ``scale-free'' version of the pivot algorithm, I have been able to calculate an extremely accurate estimate for the critical exponent γ for self-avoiding walks, obtaining γ = 1.15695300(95). The paper is: Scale-free Monte Carlo method for calculating the critical exponent γ of self-avoiding walks, arXiv:1701.08415 (2017).
  • With Burkhard Dünweg, I've published a paper which includes an accurate calculation of the hydrodynamic radius for SAWs, and calculates the Flory exponent to unprecedented accuracy, ν = 0.58759700(40): High precision estimate of the hydrodynamic radius for self-avoiding walks, Phys. Rev. E. 94: 052102 (2016). It was chosen as an Editor's suggestion.
  • Jason Whyte has written a feature article which gives a detailed but accessible explanation on the ingredients for fast Monte Carlo simulation of self-avoiding walks. Please see the SAW feature page.